Max Rady College of Medicine

Deliverables: Atlas

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2020


Our Children, Our Future: The Health and Well-being of First Nations Children in Manitoba
Chartier M, Brownell M, Star L, Murdock N, Campbell R, Phillips-Beck W, Meade C, Au W, Schultz J, Bowes JM, Cochrane B
The purpose of this report is to provide a sound baseline measure of how First Nations children are doing in order to determine if children’s lives are improving as a result of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. The present report was requested by the Healthy Child Committee of Cabinet to focus on First Nations children in Manitoba and to provide valuable information on their health and well-being – similar to Child Health Atlas reports previously prepared by Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP). The research team includes members from MCHP, First Nations Health and Social Secretariat of Manitoba (FNHSSM) and Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre (MFNERC). The analyses provide comparisons between First Nations children and all other Manitoba children, comparisons between on and off reserve First Nations, and regional comparisons by Regional Health Authority and by Tribal Council Areas. Large disparities between First Nations children and other Manitoba children were found in birth outcomes, physical health, mental health, health & prevention services, education, social services, justice system involvement and mortality. These results must be understood within the broader historical, social, legal and political context.
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2019


The Health Status of and Access to Healthcare by Registered First Nation Peoples in Manitoba
Katz A, Avery Kinew K, Star L, Taylor C, Koseva I, Lavoie J, Burchill C, Urquia M, Basham A, Rajotte L, Ramayanam V, Jarmasz J, Burchill S
This deliverable is the product of a strong and developing relationship between MCHP and the First Nations Health and Social Secretariat of Manitoba. It looks at health and healthcare use patterns of First Nations people living in Manitoba. The analyses provide comparisons between First Nations and all other Manitobans, comparisons between on and off reserve First Nations, and regional comparisons by Regional Health Authority and by Tribal Council Areas. It is the first study to use the Regional Health Survey which includes on-reserve First Nation peoples. The results demonstrate the widening gap between the health of First Nations and all other Manitobans and point to inequities in service provision.
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The 2019 RHA Indicators Atlas
Fransoo R, Mahar A, The Need to Know Team, Anderson A, Prior H, Koseva I, McCulloch S, Jarmasz J, Burchill S
All RHAs in Manitoba are working to complete the 2019 cycle of comprehensive community health assessment reports. To produce their reports, the RHAs require region- and district-specific data on a range of key indicators of health status and health care use. This deliverable updates and refines key indicators from the 2013 RHA Atlas and incorporates new indicators from other reports, including a number of indicators of maternal and child health.
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The Health Status of Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Manitoba
Chateau D, Doupe M, Prior H, Soodeen RA, Sarkar J, Dragan R, Stevenson D, Rajotte L
This report focuses on the health status and health care use patterns for community-dwelling older adults in Manitoba (i.e., not a resident of a nursing home). Using both health system data and self-report data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, a large number of indicators were examined that addressed physical health and wellbeing, mental health status, health care use, drug use, and numerous social indicators (e.g., living in social housing, receipt of income assistance, victim of crime). The baby boom generation has started to become senior citizens, and this timely report looks at the changes they may have brought with them to the population of older adults. The youngest of the older adults (age 65-74) saw a dramatic growth in size during the study period (2005-2014), boosting the population of older adults in Manitoba by over 20,000 in just five years. Above and beyond the increased demand on services that would be expected from population growth, we can expect changes in the health status of this population, and in how older Manitobans might interact with the health care system. Results are reported by three age groups (65-74, 75-84. 85+), and at regional and sub-regional levels. This will allow planners and all Manitobans to understand what is happening at a local level, and to focus primary care resources and other services and resources to meet the changing demands of this population.
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2013


The 2013 RHA Indicators Atlas
Fransoo R, Martens P, The Need to Know Team, Prior H, Burchill C, Koseva I, Bailly A, Allegro E
The 2013 RHA Indicators Atlas measured the health of Manitobans and their use of healthcare services, and found that most Manitobans are living longer and the prevalence of many diseases has decreased, but the health gap between rich and poor has widened. Researchers analyzed data using more than 70 indicators of health status and healthcare use to compare results from previous studies. Representatives from all 5 Regional Heath Authorities (RHAs), Manitoba Health, and U of M researchers collaborated in the creation of this report. Information such as: rate of improvement or prevalence among chronic disease indicators, how many people are in nursing homes, how many people were hospitalized, how many visited a doctor and how many filled prescriptions are also available in this report. Together with similar reports published in 2009 and 2003, the data provides a picture of our province's health trends spanning almost 20 years.
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2012


Health and Healthcare Utilization of Francophones in Manitoba
Chartier M, Finlayson G, Prior H, McGowan K, Chen H, de Rocquigny J, Walld R, Gousseau M
The purpose of this report is to gain a greater understanding of the health status and healthcare utilization of Francophones in Manitoba. By understanding the health and healthcare use of Francophones in the province, healthcare planners and policy makers can determine the effectiveness of services and can focus their efforts in specific areas. In addition, having better knowledge of the health status of a population contributes to our understanding of the vitality of a population. This report may also be useful to the one million Francophones living in Canada, but outside of Québec, since little is known regarding the health of this population.
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La santé et l'utilisation des services de santé des francophones du Manitoba
Chartier M, Finlayson G, Prior H, McGowan K, Chen H, de Rocquigny J, Walld R, Gousseau M
L'objet du présent rapport est d'avoir une meilleure idée de l'état de santé des francophones du Manitoba et de leur utilisation des soins de santé. En comprenant mieux l'état de santé des francophones de la province et les soins qu'ils requièrent, les planifi cateurs des soins de santé et les décideurs peuvent déterminer l'effi cacité des services et concentrer leurs eff orts sur des secteurs en particulier. De plus, une meilleure connaissance de l'état de santé d'une population nous aide à mieux cerner sa vitalité. Ce rapport pourrait aussi s'avérer utile au million de francophones du Canada vivant à l'extérieur du Québec, car on sait très peu de choses à propos de la santé de cette population.
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2010


Profile of Metis Health Status and Healthcare Utilization in Manitoba: A Population-Based Study
Martens PJ, Bartlett J, Burland E, Prior H, Burchill C, Huq S, Romphf L, Sanguins J, Carter S, Bailly A
It's widely known that the health of aboriginal populations in Canada lags behind that of other Canadians. In 2002, the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) published a report titled The Health and Health Care Use of Registered First Nations People Living in Manitoba: A Population-Based Study. The research project demonstrated that Registered First Nations people have shorter life expectancy and higher morbidity than other Manitobans, however, little has been published on the health of Aboriginals who do not have Status, such as Metis. This collaborative study between Manitoba Health, MCHP and the Manitoba Metis Federation (MMF) examines the health of the Metis population of Manitoba with indicators such as physical illness, hospital services, educational success, and the use of social services. There are some good findings and some that are troubling.
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2009


Manitoba RHA Indicators Atlas 2009
Fransoo R, Martens P, Burland E, The Need to Know Team, Prior H, Burchill C
Life expectancy in Manitoba is up to 76.3 years for men and 81.5 years for women. That's the average length of life from birth, and it's based on Manitoba data for 2001 to 2005. According to the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy's Manitoba RHA Indicators Atlas 2009, the figures are up over the previous five years by more than half a year for both men and women.
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2008


Manitoba Child Health Atlas Update
Brownell M, De Coster C, Penfold R, Derksen S, Au W, Schultz J, Dahl M
It has often been said that one can measure how advanced a society is by how well it meets the needs of its weakest and most frail members. In Manitoba, we are fortunate to live in a society where considerable time and effort has been spent to improve the health of children. Policies and programs have been designed and put into place so that in theory, all children are born with an equal chance of being healthy. And for those children born into circumstances resulting in poorer health, programs exist which try to ensure that they eventually get onto a level playing field. All this work has resulted in children, for the most part, being healthy in Manitoba.
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2005


Sex Differences in Health Status, Health Care Use, and Quality of Care: A Population-Based Analysis for Manitoba's Regional Health Authorities
Fransoo R, Martens P, The Need to Know Team, Burland E, Prior H, Burchill C, Chateau D, Walld R
Very little has been known about the differences between the sexes in Manitoba when it came to health-related issues. This report changes that. It offers Manitobans a fact-based, sex-specific, region-by-region look at health in our province.
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2004


How Do Educational Outcomes Vary With Socioeconomic Status? Key Findings from the Manitoba Child Health Atlas 2004
Brownell M, Roos NP, Fransoo R, Guevremont A, MacWilliam L, Derksen S, Dik N, Bogdanovic B, Sirski M
The poorer their neighbourhood, the more likely children are to have difficulties in school, fail standards tests, fail a grade, quit school and have shorter lives. And when do these kids start falling behind? high school? elementary school? grade one? What are the implications? What can be done to change this trend?
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2003


The Manitoba RHA Indicators Atlas: Population-Based Comparison of Health and Health Care Use
Martens PJ, Fransoo R, The Need to Know Team, Burland E, Jebamani L, Burchill C, Black C, Dik N, MacWilliam L, Derksen S, Walld R, Steinbach C, Dahl M
Our 1999 RHA health indicator report established a baseline; this report upates those indicators and adds several new ones, enabling RHA manager, planners and providers to track changes.
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2001


Changes in Health and Health Care Use of Manitobans: 1985-1998
Roos NP, Shapiro E, Bond R, Black C, Finlayson G, Newburn-Cook C, MacWilliam L, Steinbach C, Yogendran M, Walld R
Changes in Manitoban's health and the health care system over a fourteen-year period from 1985 to 1998 are reviewed in this report. Areas discussed include health status, use and availability of health services, spending, and the aging of the population.
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1999


Comparative Indicators of Population Health and Health Care use for Manitoba's Regional Health Authorities: A POPULIS Project
Black C, Roos NP, Fransoo R, Martens PJ
MCHP compiled a series of indicators, designed to assist Regional Health Authorities as they plan and deliver health care services in their regions. We first measured health status of RHA residents; we then related it to their use of health care services.
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1994


Population Health: Health Status Indicators. Volume I: Key Findings
Cohen MM, MacWilliam L
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Population Health: Health Status Indicators. Volume II: Tables and Figures
Cohen MM, MacWilliam L
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A Report on the Health Status, Socio-Economic Risk and Health Care Use of the Manitoba Population, 1992-93 and Overview of the 1990-91 to 1992-93 Findings
Frohlich N, Markesteyn T, Roos NP, Carriere KC, Black C, De Coster C, Burchill CA, MacWilliam L
POPULIS is a population-based information system developed by MCHP. It provides data on current health and illness profiles, including socio-economic risk factors and patterns of health care use across Manitoba.
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Contact us

Manitoba Centre for Health Policy
Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine,
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences,
Room 408-727 McDermot Ave.
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P5 Canada

204-789-3819