Term: Aggregated Diagnosis Groups ™ (ADGs®)

Printer friendly

Glossary Definition

Last Updated: 2013-09-19

Definition:

Formerly known as Ambulatory Diagnostic Groups, Aggregated Diagnosis Groups (ADGs) continue to be part of the Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Group® (ACG®) case-mix system. The ACG System groups every ICD-9 and ICD-10 diagnosis code assigned to a patient into one of 32 different ADGs based on five clinical and expected utilization criteria:

    1. duration of the condition (acute, recurrent, or chronic);
    2. severity of the condition (e.g., minor and stable versus major and unstable);
    3. diagnostic certainty (symptoms focusing on diagnostic evaluation versus documented disease focusing on treatment services);
    4. etiology of the condition (infectious, injury, or other); and
    5. specialty care involvement (medical, surgical, obstetric, haematology, etc.).
For more detailed information, please see the section titled Aggregated Diagnosis Groups (ADG) in the Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACG) - Overview concept, or directly from the Johns Hopkins web site: The Johns Hopkins ACG System Web Site - Describing Morbidity Burden .

NOTE: ADGs have also been referred to as Aggregated Diagnostic Groups in MCHP research and Johns Hopkins documentation. Aggregated Diagnosis Groups reflects the most current terminology.

Related concepts 

Related terms 

Links 

References 

  • The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. The Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System Documentation & Application Manual Version 5.0. In: Jonathan P. Weiner (ed). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University; 2001. 0-0.(View)
  • The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. The Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System Version 6.0 Release Notes (Systems Documentation). In: Jonathan P. Weiner (ed). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University; 2003. 0-0.(View)

Term used in 

  • Brownell M, Chartier M, Santos R, Ekuma O, Au W, Sarkar J, MacWilliam L, Burland E, Koseva I, Guenette W. How are Manitoba's Children Doing? Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2012. [Summary] [Full Report] [Data extras] [Errata] (View)
  • Bruce S, Prior H, Katz A, Taylor M, Latosinsky S, Martens P, De Coster C, Brownell M, Soodeen R, Steinbach C. Application of Patient Safety Indicators in Manitoba: A First Look. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2006. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Finlayson G, Ekuma O, Yogendran M, Burland E, Forget E. The Additional Cost of Chronic Disease in Manitoba. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2010. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Finlayson GS, Forget E, Ekuma O, Derksen S, Bond R, Martens P, De Coster C. Allocating Funds for Healthcare in Manitoba Regional Health Authorities: A First Step--Population-Based Funding. Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2007. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Hilderman T, Katz A, Derksen S, McGowan K, Chateau D, Kurbis C, Allison S, Reimer JN. Manitoba Immunization Study. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2011. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Kozyrskyj A, Lix L, Dahl M, Soodeen R. High-cost Users of Pharmaceuticals: Who are They? Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2005. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Lix L, Smith M, Pitz M, Ahmed R, Quon H, Griffith J, Turner D, Hong S, Prior H, Banerjee A, Koseva I, Kulbaba C. Cancer Data Linkage in Manitoba: Expanding the Infrastructure for Research. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2016. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Martens P, Fransoo R, The Need to Know Team, Burland E, Prior H, Burchill C, Romphf L, Chateau D, Bailly A, Ouelette C. What Works? A First Look at Evaluating Manitoba's Regional Health Programs and Policies at the Population Level. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2008. [Summary] [Full Report] [Data extras] (View)
  • Martens PJ, Fransoo R, McKeen N, The Need to Know Team, Burland E, Jebamani L, Burchill C, De Coster C, Ekuma O, Prior H, Chateau D, Robinson R, Metge C. Patterns of Regional Mental Illness Disorder Diagnoses and Service Use in Manitoba: A Population-Based Study. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2004. [Summary] [Full Report] [Data extras] (View)
  • Martens PJ, Bartlett J, Burland E, Prior H, Burchill C, Huq S, Romphf L, Sanguins J, Carter S, Bailly A. Profile of Metis Health Status and Healthcare Utilization in Manitoba: A Population-Based Study. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2010. [Summary] [Full Report] [Data extras] [Errata] (View)
  • Raymond C, Metge C, Alessi-Severini S, Dahl M, Schultz J, Guenette W. Pharmaceutical Use in Manitoba: Opportunities to Optimize Use. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2010. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Santos R, Brownell M, Ekuma O, Mayer T, Soodeen R-A. The Early Development Instrument (EDI) in Manitoba: Linking Socioeconomic Adversity and Biological Vulnerability at Birth to Children's Outcomes at Age 5. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2012. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)
  • Smith M, Finlayson G, Martens P, Dunn J, Prior H, Taylor C, Soodeen RA, Burchill C, Guenette W, Hinds A. Social Housing in Manitoba. Part II: Social Housing and Health in Manitoba: A First Look. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, 2013. [Summary] [Full Report] (View)