Max Rady College of Medicine

Deliverables: Older Adults

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2021


Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing by Manitoba Clinicians
Ruth C, Fanella S, Raymond C, Dragan R, Prior H, Dik N, Stevenson D, Koseva I, Valdivia J
Antibiotics are essential to the health of Manitobans. However, the more they are used the more bacteria can develop resistance, making the antibiotics less effective. This study looked at antibiotics dispensed in the community from 2011 to 2016, and how they linked to physician visits and diagnoses. The study found that antibiotic use increased from 2011 to 2016, with highest use in adults aged 65+ and in children under age 5; rates of inappropriate antibiotic use was high and increasing. For conditions that may need antibiotics, the antibiotics being given were often not the ones recommended by guidelines. Physicians and other providers varied widely in how often they prescribed antibiotics for a given condition. The study findings clearly indicate the need for antibiotic stewardship programs to improve antibiotic use in the community. Several other recommendations are also included in the report.
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2019


The Health Status of Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Manitoba
Chateau D, Doupe M, Prior H, Soodeen RA, Sarkar J, Dragan R, Stevenson D, Rajotte L
This report focuses on the health status and health care use patterns for community-dwelling older adults in Manitoba (i.e., not a resident of a nursing home). Using both health system data and self-report data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, a large number of indicators were examined that addressed physical health and wellbeing, mental health status, health care use, drug use, and numerous social indicators (e.g., living in social housing, receipt of income assistance, victim of crime). The baby boom generation has started to become senior citizens, and this timely report looks at the changes they may have brought with them to the population of older adults. The youngest of the older adults (age 65-74) saw a dramatic growth in size during the study period (2005-2014), boosting the population of older adults in Manitoba by over 20,000 in just five years. Above and beyond the increased demand on services that would be expected from population growth, we can expect changes in the health status of this population, and in how older Manitobans might interact with the health care system. Results are reported by three age groups (65-74, 75-84. 85+), and at regional and sub-regional levels. This will allow planners and all Manitobans to understand what is happening at a local level, and to focus primary care resources and other services and resources to meet the changing demands of this population.
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Strategies for Developing a Personal Care Home Report Card in Manitoba
Doupe M, Brownell M, McDougall C, Koseva I, Dik N, McCulloch S, Sarkar J
Personal care homes (PCHs) provide care to people who face significant and multiple challenges. Strategies are needed to help care providers continually improve the quality of the medical and social care in PCHs, and to help Manitobans identify facilities where they may like to live. The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, we identified clinical quality indicators (QIs) that providers and planners feel are most appropriate to use in PCHs. We compared these QIs across facilities in ways that help stakeholders identify residents for whom quality of care is good and also where improvements may be needed. Second, by reviewing existing websites and the academic literature, we developed a list of recommendations for developing a PCH report card website in Manitoba. This website should be designed to help people identify PCHs where they or their loved ones would like to live, and to facilitate discussions between residents and providers about the goals of PCH care
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2018


Mental Illness Among Adult Manitobans
Chartier M, Bolton J, Mota N, MacWilliam L, Ekuma O, Nie Y, McDougall C, Srisakuldee W, McCulloch S
Mental illness is prevalent across Manitoba and Canada. Statistics Canada reports that 20% of Canadians will experience a mental illness in their lifetime. This Manitoba report provides valuable background information on the burden of mental illness in the province and some insight into the longer-term associations between childhood/adolescent mental illness and adverse adult outcomes. Specifically, we examined the diagnostic prevalence of mental illness among adults in Manitoba, as well as the healthcare use and justice system involvement of adults with mental illness. To address the mental health needs of certain populations who may be at higher risk of mental illness, this report presents the prevalence in specific populations of Manitoba. A cohort of Manitobans born in the province was also developed to examine the relationship between childhood/adolescent mental disorders and adverse adult outcomes. The findings of this report will be important for planning services and programs to diagnose and treat mental illness. Coordinating services among government departments, including health, social services, education and justice, will also go a long way towards ensuring better care for Manitobans at risk for and suffering from mental illness. Finally, supporting mental health research is an essential part of understanding what works and what is needed to strengthen mental health services for Manitobans.
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2016


Supportive Housing for Seniors: Reform Implications for Manitoba's Older Adult Continuum of Care
Doupe M, Finlayson G, Khan S, Yogendran M, Schultz J, McDougall C, Kulbaba C
The older adult care continuum is generally comprised of home care services, community-based supportive housing, and personal care homes (PCHs). This research examines supportive housing and PCH use in the Winnipeg Health Region, first by identifying the proportion of newly admitted PCH residents who are clinically similar to most supportive housing tenants. We also compare some additional features of these groups, such as differences in user fees paid, differences in people’s informal support networks, and differences in their healthcare use patterns. Collectively, this research helps to define the potential for expanding supportive housing as an alternate to PCH use in Winnipeg, and identifies some of the more salient reform strategies required to help make this work.
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2012


Projecting Personal Care Home Bed Equivalent Needs in Manitoba Through 2036
Chateau D, Doupe M, Walld R, Soodeen R, Ouelette C, Rajotte L
Manitoba Health's Aging in Place initiative has created relatively new alternatives to care for aging adults, such as supportive housing and home care which has helped to keep the demand for personal care homes down. Expanding these services will be crucial for the future care of seniors in the province because, as more Manitobans age into their golden years, the need for long-term care also increases. By 2031, all Baby Boomers will be 65 or older and almost half will be older than 75, presenting a growing challenge for the healthcare system. The latest report from MCHP estimates how much the need for personal care home beds or equivalent alternatives such as supportive housing and extended home care is expected to rise. Researchers also looked into family structure - they found being married and having children lowers personal care home use. The study found the proportion of Manitobans using personal care homes has shrunk since 1985 however, by 3036 space for 5,100 more seniors will be needed in long-term care facilities. The extra capacity for care won't be needed all at once and won't be the same across the province, thus healthcare planners from across the province can use this report to prepare for future needs.
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2011


Population Aging and the Continuum of Older Adult Care in Manitoba
Doupe M, Fransoo R, Chateau D, Dik N, Burchill C, Soodeen R-A, Bozat-Emre S, Guenette W
Health regions in Manitoba are at various stages of population aging, and projected growth in the number of 75+ year-olds, the predominant personal care home (PCH) users, will vary tremendously across the province. The analyses in this report indicate PCH use will increase modestly in Manitoba until about 2020/21. Shortly after this time Baby Boomers will reach age 75 and by 2030/31, Manitoba may need 29.1% more PCH beds to cope with increasing older adult numbers. Manitoba has expanded its continuum of older adult care with supportive housing provided as an alternate to PCH use. This report provides a tool (LTCPEXP) for allocating people to these different areas. Using RAI-HC© data from Winnipeg, this tool correctly identifies, on average, 76.0% of home care, supportive housing, and PCH users. Use of this tool is important for ensuring that supportive housing fulfills its role as an alternate to PCH use, so people receive the best type of care to match their needs. Using a process called cluster analysis, this research creates a tool (LofCEXP) for describing PCH residents' needs, at least in the WRHA. By combining this strategy with provincial PCH projections, some evidence is also provided to help planners prepare for the future.
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2006


Using Administrative Data to Develop Indicators of Quality Care in Personal Care Homes
Doupe M, Brownell M, Kozyrskyj A, Dik N, Burchill C, Dahl M, Chateau D, De Coster C, Hinds A, Bodnarchuk J
How does the care Manitoba nursing home residents receive compare from one RHA to the next, or from one PCH to the next? MCHP has developed ten Quality Indicators to find the answers.
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2002


Estimating Personal Care Home Bed Requirements
Frohlich N, De Coster C, Dik N
As Manitoba's population ages, there is concern about how many nursing home beds we should have in the future. This project uses historical data to answer that question for the year 2020.
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The Health and Health Care Use of Manitoba's Seniors: Have They Changed Over Time?
Menec V, MacWilliam L, Soodeen R, Mitchell L
This study looks at the impact the province's aging population has had on the health care system, in order to anticipate what might happen in the future.
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2001


A Look at Home Care in Manitoba
Roos NP, Stranc L, Peterson S, Mitchell L, Bogdanovic B, Shapiro E
This project adds routine provincial records on home care to POPULIS, thus permitting for the first time a description of how home care is used in Manitoba.
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1993


Utilization of Personal Care Home Resources. Volume I: Key Findings
De Coster C, Roos NP, Bogdanovic B
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Utilization of Personal Care Home Resources. Volume II: Methods and Tables
De Coster C, Roos NP, Bogdanovic B
Report
Assessing Quality of Care in Manitoba Personal Care Homes by Using Administrative Data to Monitor Outcomes (Report #93-02)
Shapiro E, Tate RB
Report


Contact us

Manitoba Centre for Health Policy
Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine,
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences,
Room 408-727 McDermot Ave.
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P5 Canada

204-789-3819